Monday, June 15, 2009

God Makes Me Prosperous

I received an e-mail recently that ended with this phrase: "My success is non-negotiable and unapologetic because Christ is my source."

This makes me think its author is rich and powerful and does not care what other people think about him because Christ made him this way. It seems to epitomize a ladder-climbing, corporate mindset and tries to put it in a Christian framework.

I personally know strong, mature Christians who never have more money than enough to pay their bills and eat. Some Christians I know barely have even that. I do not think that we can conclude that a dynamic relationship with Christ means that the individual will have a great job with great pay. Is it good to believe that our faithfulness to Christ demands a blessing of riches? If we are seeking such a blessing, can we really say that we are seeking Christ?

I suppose, however, that we need to define what "success" means. It is measured by money or power? Is it quantified by the number of friends or fans one has? The number of children? How are we to understand true success?

2 comments:

  1. I have to agree 100% with you. If we are seeking money, wealth, fame, popularity and all of those kinds of worldly things, we are not truely seeking Christ here. The Bible states that our treasures are not of this world. Keeping your eye on the prize at the end of the race (which for me is to be able to stand next to Jesus) pays more than any other endevour here on earth. Lord, help me remember that the treasures I have here will disappear before you as your stately glory is magnified.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I would really like to know how this quote works out practically in the here and now. It seems as though this comment strips away one of the central messages of Christ: sacrifice. Is the author expecting "success" here and now? or is he expecting success in the afterlife? and most importantly, if he means success here and now, whose definition of success is he/she using?

    ReplyDelete

What do you think?